To the extent possible under law, AOP-Wiki has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to KER:1766

Relationship: 1766

Title

A descriptive phrase which clearly defines the two KEs being considered and the sequential relationship between them (i.e., which is upstream, and which is downstream). More help

Protection against oxidative stress, decreased leads to Oxidative Stress

Upstream event
The causing Key Event (KE) in a Key Event Relationship (KER). More help
Downstream event
The responding Key Event (KE) in a Key Event Relationship (KER). More help

Key Event Relationship Overview

The utility of AOPs for regulatory application is defined, to a large extent, by the confidence and precision with which they facilitate extrapolation of data measured at low levels of biological organisation to predicted outcomes at higher levels of organisation and the extent to which they can link biological effect measurements to their specific causes. Within the AOP framework, the predictive relationships that facilitate extrapolation are represented by the KERs. Consequently, the overall WoE for an AOP is a reflection in part, of the level of confidence in the underlying series of KERs it encompasses. Therefore, describing the KERs in an AOP involves assembling and organising the types of information and evidence that defines the scientific basis for inferring the probable change in, or state of, a downstream KE from the known or measured state of an upstream KE. More help

AOPs Referencing Relationship

AOP Name Adjacency Weight of Evidence Quantitative Understanding Point of Contact Author Status OECD Status
Binding of electrophilic chemicals to SH(thiol)-group of proteins and /or to seleno-proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress during brain development leads to impairment of learning and memory adjacent High High Marie-Gabrielle Zurich (send email) Under development: Not open for comment. Do not cite WPHA/WNT Endorsed

Taxonomic Applicability

Latin or common names of a species or broader taxonomic grouping (e.g., class, order, family) that help to define the biological applicability domain of the KER.In general, this will be dictated by the more restrictive of the two KEs being linked together by the KER.  More help
Term Scientific Term Evidence Link
mouse Mus musculus High NCBI
rat Rattus norvegicus High NCBI
human Homo sapiens NCBI
zebra fish Danio rerio NCBI

Sex Applicability

An indication of the the relevant sex for this KER. More help
Sex Evidence
Male High
Female High

Life Stage Applicability

An indication of the the relevant life stage(s) for this KER.  More help
Term Evidence
All life stages High

Key Event Relationship Description

Provides a concise overview of the information given below as well as addressing details that aren’t inherent in the description of the KEs themselves. More help

High levels of oxidizing free radicals can be very damaging to cells and molecules within the cell.  As a result, the cell has important defense mechanisms to protect itself from ROS, including reducing agents, glutathione peroxidases, thioredoxin reductases. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defenses. Ensuing from this definition, a decrease in cellular antioxidant protection will lead to the increase of oxidative stress.

Evidence Collection Strategy

Include a description of the approach for identification and assembly of the evidence base for the KER.  For evidence identification, include, for example, a description of the sources and dates of information consulted including expert knowledge, databases searched and associated search terms/strings.  Include also a description of study screening criteria and methodology, study quality assessment considerations, the data extraction strategy and links to any repositories/databases of relevant references.Tabular summaries and links to relevant supporting documentation are encouraged, wherever possible. More help

Evidence Supporting this KER

Addresses the scientific evidence supporting KERs in an AOP setting the stage for overall assessment of the AOP. More help
Biological Plausibility
Addresses the biological rationale for a connection between KEupstream and KEdownstream.  This field can also incorporate additional mechanistic details that help inform the relationship between KEs, this is useful when it is not practical/pragmatic to represent these details as separate KEs due to the difficulty or relative infrequency with which it is likely to be measured.   More help

The cell has important defense mechanisms to protect itself from oxidative stress. The cellular defense mechanisms are numerous and include repair mechanisms, prevention mechanisms, physical defenses, as well as antioxidant defense such as antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants and chelating agents (Kohen, 2002). Whenever one or many of these mechanisms are decreased, the balance will tilt towards the production of ROS, and thus generate oxidative stress. In this KER we focus on the decreased protection due to interference with the antioxidant defense system.

Uncertainties and Inconsistencies
Addresses inconsistencies or uncertainties in the relationship including the identification of experimental details that may explain apparent deviations from the expected patterns of concordance. More help

No uncertainties, since a decrease in protection against oxidative stress leads, by definition, to an increase in oxidative stress

Known modulating factors

This table captures specific information on the MF, its properties, how it affects the KER and respective references.1.) What is the modulating factor? Name the factor for which solid evidence exists that it influences this KER. Examples: age, sex, genotype, diet 2.) Details of this modulating factor. Specify which features of this MF are relevant for this KER. Examples: a specific age range or a specific biological age (defined by...); a specific gene mutation or variant, a specific nutrient (deficit or surplus); a sex-specific homone; a certain threshold value (e.g. serum levels of a chemical above...) 3.) Description of how this modulating factor affects this KER. Describe the provable modification of the KER (also quantitatively, if known). Examples: increase or decrease of the magnitude of effect (by a factor of...); change of the time-course of the effect (onset delay by...); alteration of the probability of the effect; increase or decrease of the sensitivity of the downstream effect (by a factor of...) 4.) Provision of supporting scientific evidence for an effect of this MF on this KER. Give a list of references.  More help
Response-response Relationship
Provides sources of data that define the response-response relationships between the KEs.  More help
Time-scale
Information regarding the approximate time-scale of the changes in KEdownstream relative to changes in KEupstream (i.e., do effects on KEdownstream lag those on KEupstream by seconds, minutes, hours, or days?). More help
Known Feedforward/Feedback loops influencing this KER
Define whether there are known positive or negative feedback mechanisms involved and what is understood about their time-course and homeostatic limits. More help

Domain of Applicability

A free-text section of the KER description that the developers can use to explain their rationale for the taxonomic, life stage, or sex applicability structured terms. More help

The link between decrease in antioxidant protection and induction of oxidative stress can be found in Zebrafish, rodents (mouse and rat) and in man, but may not be restricted to these species.

References

List of the literature that was cited for this KER description. More help

Acaroz, U. et al. (2018) The ameliorative effects of boron against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and metabolic changes in rats. Food Chem Toxicol 118, 745-752.

Agrawal, S. et al. (2015) Changes in tissue oxidative stress, brain biogenic amines and acetylcholinesterase following co-exposure to lead, arsenic and mercury in rats. Food Chem Toxicol 86, 208-216.

Alturfan, A.A. et al. (2012) Resveratrol ameliorates oxidative DNA damage and protects against acrylamide-induced oxidative stress in rats. Mol Biol Rep 39, 4589-4596.

Branco, V. et al. (2017) Impaired cross-talk between the thioredoxin and glutathione systems is related to ASK-1 mediated apoptosis in neuronal cells exposed to mercury. Redox Biol 13, 278-287.

Deepmala, J. et al. (2013) Protective effect of combined therapy with dithiothreitol, zinc and selenium protects acute mercury induced oxidative injury in rats. J Trace Elem Med Biol 27, 249-256.

Farina, M. et al. (2009) Probucol increases glutathione peroxidase-1 activity and displays long-lasting protection against methylmercury toxicity in cerebellar granule cells. Toxicol Sci 112, 416-426.

Franco, J.L. et al. (2009) Methylmercury neurotoxicity is associated with inhibition of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Free Radic Biol Med 47, 449-457.

Fujimura, M., Usuki, F. (2017) In situ different antioxidative systems contribute to the site-specific methylmercury neurotoxicity in mice. Toxicology 392, 55-63.

Glaser, V. et al. (2013) Protective effects of diphenyl diselenide in a mouse model of brain toxicity. Chem Biol Interact 206, 18-26.

Joshi, D. et al. (2014) Reversal of methylmercury-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and DNA damage by the treatment of N-acetyl cysteine: a protective approach. J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 33, 167-182.

Kohen, R., Nyska, A. (2002) Oxidation of biological systems: oxidative stress phenomena, antioxidants, redox reactions, and methods for their quantification. Toxicol Pathol 30, 620-650.

Meinerz, D.F. et al. (2011) Protective effects of organoselenium compounds against methylmercury-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain mitochondrial-enriched fractions. Braz J Med Biol Res 44, 1156-1163.

Pan, X., et al. (2015) Melatonin attenuates oxidative damage induced by acrylamide invitro and in vivo. Ox. Med. Cell Longevity Vol 2015, Article ID 703709.

Rush, T. et al. (2012) Glutathione-mediated neuroprotection against methylmercury neurotoxicity in cortical culture is dependent on MRP1. Neurotoxicology 33, 476-481.

Usuki, F. et al. (2011) Post-transcriptional defects of antioxidant selenoenzymes cause oxidative stress under methylmercury exposure. J Biol Chem 286, 6641-6649.

Zhao, M et al. (2017) Effect of acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity in a primary astrocytes/microglial co-culture model. Toxicol in Vitro 39, 119-125.