API

Relationship: 1702

Title

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Interaction with the lung cell membrane leads to Increased proinflammatory mediators

Upstream event

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Interaction with the lung cell membrane

Downstream event

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Increased proinflammatory mediators

Key Event Relationship Overview

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AOPs Referencing Relationship

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AOP Name Adjacency Weight of Evidence Quantitative Understanding
Substance interaction with the lung resident cell membrane components leading to lung fibrosis adjacent High Not Specified

Taxonomic Applicability

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Sex Applicability

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Life Stage Applicability

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Key Event Relationship Description

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Innate immune response is the first line of defence in any organism against invading infectious pathogens and toxic substances. It involves tissue triggered startle response to cellular stress and is described by a complex set of interactions between the toxic stimuli, soluble macromolecules and cells (reviewed in Nathan C, 2002). The process culminates in a functional change defined as inflammation, purpose of which is to resolve infection and promote healing. In lungs, the interaction of toxic substances with resident cells results in cellular stress, death or necrosis leading to release of intracellular components such as alarmins (DAMPs, IL-1a, HMGB1). Released alarmins (danger sensors) bind cell surface receptors such as Interleukin 1 Receptor 1 (IL-1R1), Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) or others leading to activation of innate immune response signalling.

For example, binding of IL-1a to IL-1R1 can release Nuclear Factor (NF)-κb resulting in its translocation to nucleus and transactivation of pro-inflammatory genes including cytokines, growth factors and acute phase genes. The signalling also stimulates secretion of a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators. Overexpression of IL-1a in cells induces increased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators. Products of necrotic cells are shown to stimulate the immune system in an IL-1R1-dependent manner (Chen et al., 2007).

The secreted alarmins activate resident cells pre-stationed in the tissues such as mast cells or macrophages leading to propagation of the already initiated immune response by releasing more eicosanoids, cytokines, chemokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators. Thus, secreted mediators signal the recruitment of neutrophils, which are the first cell types to be recruited in acute inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil influx in sterile inflammation is driven mainly by IL-1a (Rider P, 2011). IL-1 mediated signalling regulates neutrophil influx in silica-induced acute lung inflammation (Horning V, 2008). IL1 signalling also mediates neutrophil influx in other tissues and organs including liver and peritoneum. Other types of cells including macrophages, eosinophils, lymphocytes are also recruited in a signal-specific manner. Recruitment of leukocytesinduces critical cytokines associated with the Th2 immune response, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-13.

Evidence Supporting this KER

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Biological Plausibility

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Empirical Evidence

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Uncertainties and Inconsistencies

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Quantitative Understanding of the Linkage

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Response-response Relationship

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Known Feedforward/Feedback loops influencing this KER

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Domain of Applicability

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References

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